How to report Pavement Parking Problems

Pavement Parking is unsafe, unfair and illegal

From 11 December 2023, pavement parking will be an offence in Scotland?

The The Highland Council will be able to enforce this with Penalty Charge Notices. The Penalty Charge Notice will be £100 or the removal of the vehicle in contravention.

Also included in the ban are parking blocking a dropped kerb, and double parking

Report Problem Parking

Problem parking can be reported to the Highland Council via the parking portal.

You will need to be able to identify the location of the issue on a map in order to complete the form. The is also the option to submit photos of the issue.

You can also contact your local councillors about any issue – and ask them to escalate it on your behalf.

Areas with a high number of complaints will be be visited more frequently by parking enforcement.

Pavement Parking to be an offence from December 2023

Pavement parking on Huntly Street, Inverness

From the 11th December 2023 parking on pavements, blocking dropped kerbs and double parking will become an offence. The Highland Council will issue warning notices advising offenders of the change in regulations until early 2024, when fines of £100 will be issued or the vehicle may be removed.

Not just Pavement Parking…

The regulations also include other parking offences including ;

-a ban on pavement parking

-a ban on double-parking (more than 50cm from the edge of a carriageway)

-a ban on parking at dropped kerbs installed for pedestrian or cycle usage

Reporting Parking Problems

Parking problems including pavement parking, and blocking dropped kerbs can be reported to the HC parking team at parking@highland.gov.uk or tweet @HighlandParking.

News Welcomed

The news has been welcomed by active travel campaigners in Highland.

The Road to 20mph in the Highlands

The Highland Cycle campaign has long been a supporter of 20mph speed limits for built up areas in the Highlands. The Highland Council has recently begun a trial of 20mph areas and HCC will be campaigning for this. We want to see permanent 20mph zones that are supported with traffic calming measures and enforcement. Here we take a look at the road to 20mph.

20mph sign painted onto a road

A Timeline

1991First 20mph zones are introduced in the UK
2005 The Highland Council begins roll out of part-time 20mph zones outside all primary and secondary schools in Highland. 
2009 Inverness city centre 20mph zone introduced, this was extended in 2017
2012Groups representing Highland cyclists (including HCC) call for measures that bring about a cycle culture – including 20mph zones
2015The Highland Cycle Campaign calls for a 20mph speed limit to be introduced in all residential streets in Inverness.
2018The RESTRICTED ROADS (20 MPH SPEED LIMIT) (SCOTLAND) BILL is introduced at the Scottish Parliament by  Green MSP Mark Ruskell. The bill is not passed.
2020The Welsh Government task force on 20mph publishes its report on 20mph on restricted roads – Senedd Cymru votes to support this. Legislation is approved in 2022, with the limits coming into effect in 2023.
2021The ‘Scottish Government and Scottish Green Party Shared Policy Programme’ includes the commitment that all appropriate roads in built up areas will have a safer speed limit of 20mph by 2025.
2022The Highland Councils Economy and Infrastructure committee is presented with the Highland 20mph programme. Highland council agrees to trial the temporary 20mph limits, for which it will receive funding from Transport Scotland.
2023Highland Council starts roll out of 20mph limits (lines and signs) in communities across the Highlands.

The Highland wide 20mph scheme went live on Monday 31 July 2023, the scheme uses one Council wide Temporary Road Traffic Regulation Order (TTRO) which lasts for a period of 18 months. Permanent Road Traffic Regulation Orders will then be required to move the appropriate roads to a permanent 20mph speed limit.

What Next?

In 2024 there will be public consultation and a consultation with community councils on the 20mph limits. At the end of 2024 (or early 2025) an evaluation report will go to the full council. By mid 2025 A final decision will be made on which streets should be retained at 20mph or revert back to 30mph. The remaining six months of the trial will be used to implement any permanent changes.

Get Involved

The Highland Cycle Campaign is member led – if you’d like to get involved with the campaign team for 20mph zones or any of our other campaigns, get in touch.

Campaign Goals Updated

On Thursday the 28th September members met to consider our campaign goals, and what the Highland Cycle Campaign should campaign on going forward.

The following text was agreed: 

The Highland Cycle Campaign wants to see a thriving and sustainable region of healthy, happy people where everyone feels able to enjoy the benefits of cycling and make the journeys they choose to by bike.   We will campaign in the Highlands for cycling infrastructure that is safe, inclusive, connected and pleasant. 

We then discussed what campaigns we could initially run to meet each of the 4 goals.  

SafeInclusiveConnectedPleasant
-20mph in built up areas
-Vulnerable road user training for THC drivers
-Removing Barriers on Cycle routes-Linked with Public Transport
-Cycle ways that Connectcommunities
-Playstreets in the Highlands
Possible future campaigns
-Better Signage

Campaigns will be reviewed at the AGM.

Get Involved

If you’d like to be involved in any of these campaigns get in touch.

Playstreets in the Highlands?

by Emily Williams, Cycling Mayor of Inverness

Together with Crown Connects, I have been campaigning to get the Highland Council to set up a process that will allow local communities to hold playstreets – aiming to hold the first trial even in the Crown area of Inverness in September. Playstreets are where residents are granted a temporary road closure to allow their children to play out without having to worry about traffic.

For a wonderful example of what this could look like see this from Edinburgh: 

A wonderful example of what playstreets can look like

Giving Children the Freedom to Play

This used to be a normal part of everyday life (1), but as roads have become busier and cars have become bigger and faster, children have become less able to safely use the road just outside their house for play.  Closing the road for a short time, on a regular basis, gives children back this freedom (2)- encouraging energetic outdoor play in a semi supervised environment, giving them space right outside their front door to learn to ride a bike or play ball or whatever they want.

As well as this it gives a great opportunity for all residents to spend time outside their houses, hopefully growing some community connections (outdoor board games or just a chat over cup of tea with someone down the road you haven’t met before anyone?)

Making Progress

But we need the Highland Council to allow us to do this in a way that is accessible to all community groups. Currently we are trying to negotiate some hurdles to be allowed to implement our own traffic management rather than having to pay to have this done professionally, and to agree a position on what insurance is needed. We’ve been really grateful to have the support of local councillors David Gregg, Ian Brown, Kate Maclean and Michael Cameron. David asked a question in the most recent full council about this (side note, this is a excellent way to get a formal answer to a question from the council), which has committed the officers to investigating what is available in other places (3). We are still optimistic that we will be able to hold our pilot event and then use the learning from our experience to make this available to everyone across the highlands. 

Let us Know What you think!

So, let us know – would you be interested in holding a play street where you live if a simple process was available to you? If you are then let us know, and speak with your local councillors to encourage them to support this proposal. 

Notes

(1) https://playingout.net/why/the-problem/

(2) https://playingout.net/why/10-good-reasons/

(3) https://www.highland.gov.uk/meetings/meeting/4820/highland_council/attachment/81852